Census 2020: Asian Americans Stand to be Heard

On the South Side of Chicago sits Chinatown, the historic lively business district concentrated primarily along Cermak Road and Wentworth Avenue. A staple among the many shops and cafes is the Triple Crown Restaurant, a family-owned icon serving dim sum and other delights for 25-years. More than a third of the City’s Chinese population calls this ethnic enclave – home. About nine miles north of Chinatown, there’s QIdeas Plants and Gifts on 1134 W Argyle St. in an area of Uptown known as “Little Vietnam” and “Asia on Argyle.”

Another Measure Of Urban Removal In Uptown Is Underway

On July 21, the Chicago City Council officially rezoned the Weiss Hospital parking lot on 4600 Marine Drive from medical to residential use. Submitted by Lincoln Properties, and championed by the 46th Ward Alderman James Cappleman, this development paves the way for constructing a 314-unit luxury apartment building – a proposal that has been vociferously objected to by the people of Uptown. These objections come in the wake of the growing lack of affordable housing in Uptown, coupled with the declining racial and income diversity of the neighborhood. Today, whites comprise over 50% of Uptown’s residents, with all other non-white race/ethnicities having declined, some significantly. Correspondingly, the median income has also increased from $19,711 in 1989, to $55,100 in 2018.

Warehouse Archipelago pt. 5

As many as four million workers labor in clusters of warehouses scattered across the United States. Many are mislabeled as ‘temps’; all are poorly paid, and on-the-job injuries are high. In the article “The Warehouse Archipelago”, John Lippert and Stephen Franklin investigate the current state of staffing in the warehouse industry. Part Five, the final section of the weekly Chicago Reporter series Lippert and Franklin explore how hefty campaign contributions mean primarily white, union workers wield far more clout in the Biden administration than Black and Brown unorganized workers. PRESIDENT BIDEN seems more inclined than either of

his two Democratic predecessors to regard unions as part of the bedrock of his political base, says Nelson Lichtenstein, a labor historian at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

20 Years After 09/11, Anti-Arab Imperialist Racism Is Alive And Well

The idea that anti-Arab and anti-Muslim racism started after September 11, 2001, is one thing many progressives get wrong.  At least since the late 1970s, the U.S. government has been racially profiling Arab immigrant activists through surveillance and the corporate media has been portraying Arabs as savage misogynists. This racial profiling continued through the Clinton administration with the Omnibus Counterterrorism Bill of 1995. The bill, supported by then Senator Joe Biden, enabled the new McCarthyism that many people contend started after 9/11. It allowed the government to use secret evidence in deportation proceedings for “aliens.” Consequently, the government could hide the source of information used to deport someone. Arab Muslim immigrant men were the primary population targeted by such secret evidence.

Latino Chicagoans Kick Off Independence Celebrations With Flag-Waving Caravans

It may come as a surprise to people in other parts of the country that the Midwest, being so far from the coasts and so far from the Rio Bravo, has a robust Latino population. But here, it’s a well-known fact that Chicago has been a city of migrants for more than a century and that the Spanish- and bilingual-speaking demographic is growing to the point of comprising one third of the population. As the calendar marks the start of Hispanic Heritage Month (HHM)—yes I know; the word Hispanic is a misnomer to many, especially due to this next fact—it’s worth noting that it aligns with the independence of various Latin American nations. Independence from whom or what? From its former colonial power, Spain.

The Warehouse Archipelago pt. 4

As many as four million workers labor in clusters of warehouses scattered across the United States. Many are mislabeled as ‘temps’; all are poorly paid, and on-the-job injuries are high. In the article “The Warehouse Archipelago”, John Lippert and Stephen Franklin investigate the current state of staffing in the warehouse industry. Part Four of the weekly Chicago Reporter series Lippert and Franklin explore the reopening of the economy battered by COVID-19 mitigations providing new hope for warehouse workers. THE NEWS ABOUT worker shortages and rising wages at companies with the reopening of the economy may suggest new hopes for warehouse workers.

The Warehouse Archipelago pt. 3

As many as four million workers labor in clusters of warehouses scattered across the United States. Many are mislabeled as ‘temps’; all are poorly paid, and on-the-job injuries are high. In the article “The Warehouse Archipelago”, John Lippert and Stephen Franklin investigate the current state of staffing in the warehouse industry. Part Three of the weekly Chicago Reporter series Lippert and Franklin explore how staffing companies exploited the 9/11 terror attacks to get workers at lower pay rates. In the wake of the 9/11 terror attacks, when many employers fired workers who lacked papers showing they were legally in the U.S., staffing companies stepped into the breach.

Census 2020: “Black people aren’t leaving Chicago…they’re being forced out”

The door opens as a chime announces the entrance of a customer, a woman who approaches the counter window to pick up her order of the Viola strawberry cheesecake. A few minutes later, the door opens again, the chime makes its customary welcome, and another customer makes a pick-up. This time it’s the Pecan Pleasure cheesecake. This ritual repeats over and over again as it’s 12:30 p.m. on a Thursday at Schweet Cheesecake in what’s known as the Soul City Corridor of Austin; the early afternoon is when the Black-owned bakery is busiest. Chamille Weddington, Co-owner of Schweet Cheesecake in her bakery shop on Chicago Avenue, Austin.

Census 2020: “Chicago Is Still The Land Of Opportunity”

A couple enters through one of the two wood-framed double doors, glances around the crowded spacious casual style dining restaurant for open tables, and decides on a spot for two in the patio offered to them by Marci Berner co-owner of Tata’s Tacos in Lakeview. Marci Berner, co-owner of Tata’s Tacos

It’s the second “authentic American food with a Mexican flavor” eatery – as Berner calls it, that she opened on the North Side. The first Tata’s Tacos to serve the tasty hand-sized dishes welcomed patrons in Portage Park in 2018. Like most restaurateurs, Berner and her partner made difficult decisions last year due to the coronavirus pandemic. “Takeout and delivery became a big part of the business,” she says.

The Warehouse Archipelago pt. 2

As many as four million workers labor in clusters of warehouses scattered across the United States. Many are mislabeled as ‘temps’; all are poorly paid, and on-the-job injuries are high. In the article “The Warehouse Archipelago”, John Lippert and Stephen Franklin investigate the current state of staffing in the warehouse industry. Part Two of the weekly Chicago Reporter series introduces Irma Mosqueda, a warehouse worker in her mid-fifties, a single parent, afraid to speak about the dangerous working conditions for fear of getting fired. Then, a workplace accident took one of her legs.